Small Business Tips

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A small business blog featuring tips to help entrepreneurs succeed in the small business world. Topics include family business, human resources, marketing, money, networking, operations, ownership, startup, taxes and technology.
Finding the Right Price for Your Product or Service

The price of the product or service you provide determines whether your business succeeds or fails. If the price is right (as Bob Barker says), then your business will produce profits and grow, but if it’s wrong, your business could be destined for bankruptcy.

Far too many businesses choose the price of their product/service based upon only one calculation, when there are actually a number of elements you should consider together to come up with the best amount.

When determining a price for your product/service, considering the following:

Cover the Costs
The price you come up with should include enough to cover the cost of manufacturing the product or providing the service your business has to offer. If you travel, include the cost of mileage and expenses. If you provide mass quantities of a product, divide your costs to determine what it costs to make only one. If you can’t cover your overhead in the price of a product, your company will never break even or even make a profit.

Consider the Competition
And when I say consider, that’s exactly what I mean. Don’t price your product/service to be cheaper than the competition, just in the hopes that you’ll get all their business. If consumers trust your competitor more or like his product more, they will still go to him, even if he is more expensive.

However, when determining your prices, keep your competitors’ prices in mind as a range, since you don’t want to set your prices gobs higher (or too much lower). Also, look into how much business they generate and how that relates to prices they provide. Supply and demand really comes into play here.

Calculate the Value
Determining the true value of the product or service you are providing by looking at what consumers are paying others for it. eBay is a great example of how every person values things differently. Ask people you trust, such as friends, family and employees, what they would be willing to pay for your product/service and what they would expect would be included at that price.

Find out what clients would do if your product/service wasn’t offered. Also, ask them how your product/service is helping. If Bob tells you that you are saving him tons of money because your product is so inexpensive and delivery super fast, then you should probably be raising your prices a bit and charging more for a speedy delivery (while still giving Bob a great deal, of course).

Make sure you are looking at all of these elements when determining what your prices should be. And don’t worry about changing your prices if what you currently charge isn’t working. Most consumers won’t even notice, and you can simply explain to the ones that do that you really weren’t making it on the previous prices. If they are loyal to your business and like the product/service you provide, they’ll understand.

Supplemental Information:
The following questions are things you should take into account when establishing your prices–

1) What are the direct costs of your product or service?
The direct materials and labor associated with your offerings.

2) What are your business’s indirect expenses?
Often referred to as overhead and include expenses such as insurance, advertising, rent, office expenses and more.

3) What is your breakeven point?
Breakeven is where your costs and your income are equal–meaning, there’s no profit.

4) How is your competition pricing their offerings?
Compare your products to the competition. Adding value enables you to promote your products more profitably.

5) What is the state of your industry?
What was hot last year may not be this year. Understanding the market landscape will help you make better business decisions now and in the future.

Set your prices accordingly, but don’t be afraid to adjust them to your business’s need and market changes.

Source/Related Reading:
• Pricing – The Magic Number
• – Set the Best Price for Your Product
• – Setting Your Product’s Price
• – Pricing

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What Makes Gasoline So Expensive These Days?
What IRS Auditors Look For
Starting Your Own Business, Part 4 of 4
The Psychology of Pricing
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By Michelle Cramer
Monday, March 19th, 2018 @ 12:00 AM CDT

Operations |

National Minimum Wage on the Verge of Increasing

It’s been over 10 years since the national minimum wage was increased. Ten years! I find that simply astounding. The cost of living has gone up in that amount of time, without a doubt, but the income that many families generate hasn’t budged. There is something very wrong with that picture and the Senate is pushing for a change.

The plan is to increase the current minimum wage of $5.15 per hour to $7.25 in three increments over the next two years. I like the idea of easing into the change, so that small businesses can adjust accordingly. The Senate bill also includes some tax breaks for small business to ease the transitional pain, while hitting up the large corporate businesses for more money to balance things out.

The bill currently under examination will no longer allow corporations to deduct the cost of jury verdicts or out of court settlements in lawsuits, generating an estimated $540 million over the next ten years. A beautiful plan if you ask me. Even though I work for a law firm that represents local corporations, I think that a corporation that is found guilty of wrong doing in a jury trial should not be allowed to deduct the funds it has to pay out from the judgment. It seems to defeat the purpose of punishment.

Also, the tax-defered portion of severance or retirement packages given to former corporate executives will be limited. Instead of all $210 million like former Home Depot Chaiman-CEO Bob Nardelli received (don’t even get me started on that one) being tax deferred, the amount defferable would be limited to $1 million a year or a figure equivalent to the five year average of the receipient’s taxable salary. Another brilliant idea, especially since it is expected to generate $810 million in revenue over the next 10 years.

What’s funny to me is that those in the Senate who are against the minimum wage increase claim that the beneficiaries would likely only be teenagers with part-time jobs, rather than the working poor. Uh, hello, I beg to differ! As one whose husband stocks shelves in a grocery store to help pay for college, I am well aware of the fact that the minimum wage increase would be highly beneficial to our income.

Additionally, there are plenty of people working at McDonald’s that do so full time to support a family who would benefit from the increase. I used to work in day care, and even those teachers are barely paid just over minimum wage (around $6 an hour), at least where I’m from. Explain to me how these people wouldn’t benefit?

The House version of the bill doesn’t include tax breaks for small businesses (boo), but they plan to address those issues in a separate bill. This will cause a bit of a slow down between House and Senate in getting the bill passed on to the President, but ultimately I think both the increase and tax breaks will become law. Congress would be imbeciles not to pass them. It’s simply time for it.

Minimum Wage Increase Chart

Minimum Wage Increase Chart

• AOL Small Business: Minimum Wage Bill Divides Businesses

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How Changes in Congress Could Affect Small Business
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Alternative Minimum Tax
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By Michelle Cramer
Sunday, March 18th, 2018 @ 12:02 AM CDT

Money, Taxes |

Is Your Business Online Yet?

If you’re reading this, chances are you did a little websurfing, and are familiar with the vast space known as the World Wide Web (and it’s called that for a reason). So if you’re reading this and don’t yet have a website for your own business, I have to ask, what’s the hold-up?

There are many excuses as to why some businesses don’t have websites, all of which are misconceptions, such as:

Myth: A website is too expensive to start and maintain.
Fact: There are many website services online that provide everything from free webhosting with pre-established templates, to inexpensive webhosting (less than $60 a month) with a little more glam. Any of these can be put together and maintained by anyone who is familiar with the internet, but doesn’t know any of the programming jargon. Simply type free website in Google search and you’re on your way.

Myth: No one will use the website.
Fact: EVERYONE will use the website, if you let them know it’s there. Put it on your business cards, your ads, your receipts. I guarantee that everyone who visits your business will visit your website at one time or another, if for no other reason but to cure websurfing boredom. And if you have lots of exciting features and information, they will be glad they did.

Myth: A website won’t help my business sales.
Fact: Nearly everyone spends time on the Internet, and Internet sales increase on a continual basis. Even if you don’t have the capabilities available on your website for customers to purchase your service, providing as much information as possible and a means of contacting you will inevitably lead to an increase in clientele and sales.

People use the internet to “brand surf.” Most, when interested in a product or service, will turn to the internet first to see what’s available. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve looked up a service online, found listings for local providers, and then been disappointed because the provider I’m interested in learning more about doesn’t have a website.

A recent example was when I was buying furniture for our new home. I wanted to go online and see what the distributors carried instead of driving all over town. Even if I couldn’t buy it online, I wanted to narrow down the prospects. But many of the local businesses didn’t have a site, and I ended up wasting lots of my time going to places that had nothing I liked. The last thing you want to do is frustrate your potential customers like that.

The Internet is a valuable resource for establishing and growing your business, and every small business owner should be taking advantage of it. If you’re already online, great! I hope to come across your site sometime and see what you have to offer. If not, then you’re way behind and, to put it bluntly, it’s time you caught up to the rest of the world. So, get busy punching those keys and making your business readily available to everyone!

Related Readings:
• 10 Web Tips for Entrepreneurs

Related Small Business Buzz Posts:
Help Wanted: Advertising Job Openings Online
Internet Business Sees Holiday Shopping Boom
Online Meetings, The Board Room Alternative
The Lawsuit Risks of Having a Website
Inexpensive Ways to Conduct Marketing Research

By Michelle Cramer
Saturday, March 17th, 2018 @ 12:00 AM CDT

Marketing |